Suggested reading

Have a look at some of the books we have enjoyed reading:

The Intelligent Investor

By Benjamin Graham. Presents the philosophy of “value investing”, which helps protect investors against the areas of possible substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies with which they will be comfortable down the road. This book enables you to make the right decisions to protect your investments and make them a success. http://www.kalahari.com/books/Intelligent-Investor/632/28017337.aspx

One Up on Wall Street

By Peter Lynch, John Rothchild. An updated edition of a classic that explains how to research stocks and offers easy-to-follow directions for making the correct choice. It also explains why one should focus on the fundamentals of a company, and not on its stock value fluctuations. http://www.kalahari.com/books/One-Up-on-Wall-Street/632/5427420.aspx

The Richest Man in Babylon

By George S. Clason. What can a book written in the 1920s tell modern investors about their finances? A whole lot if it’s George Clason’s delightful set of parables that explain the basics of money. This is a great gift for a graduate or anyone who seems baffled by the world of finance and a wonderful, refreshing read for even the most experienced investor. http://www.kalahari.com/books/The-Richest-Man-in-Babylon/632/30606485.aspx

The Millionaire Next Door

By William D. Danko. The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy.  …the answer has been found in the bestselling The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy… advance degrees, and even intelligence. The Millionaire Next Door identifies seven common traits that show up… http://www.kalahari.com/books/The-Millionaire-Next-Door/632/449624.aspx

A Mathematician Plays the Market

By John Allen Paulos. Can a renowned mathematician successfully outwit the stock market? Not when his biggest investment is WorldCom. This text tells the story of how John Allen Paulos gambled – and lost – in his calamitous attempts to make a fortune on the stock market. http://www.kalahari.com/books/A-Mathematician-Plays-the-Stock-Market/632/27626708.aspx

The Quants

By Scott Patterson. How a Small Band of Maths Wizards Took Over Wall Street and Nearly Destroyed it. Quants – quantitative analysts – were the maths geniuses let loose in Wall Street’s candy store. This title follows them from obscurity to boom and then to bust, explaining why they were so self-confident, and how they got it so disastrously wrong. http://www.kalahari.com/books/The-Quants/632/35437859.aspx

Fooled by Randomness

By Nassim Nicholas Taleb. The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets. Everyone wants to succeed in life. But what causes some of us to be more successful than others? This book aims to change the way you think about business and the world. It also seeks to shatter the illusions of people around the world by teaching them how to recognize randomness. http://www.kalahari.com/books/Fooled-by-Randomness/632/30344677.aspx

Liar’s Poker

By Michael Lewis. From mere trainee, to triumphal Big Swinging Dick: that was Michael Lewis’ pell-mell progress through the dealing rooms of Salomon Brothers in New York and London during the heady mid-1980s when they were probably the world’s most powerful and profitable merchant bank. This is a tale of greed and ambition set in an obsessed, enclosed world. http://www.kalahari.com/books/Liars-Poker/632/34759218.aspx

Rogue Trader

By Nick Leeson. This grippingly tells the inside story of how the greatest gamble ever made rocked the City of London to its foundations. Nick Leeson’s autobiographical account reveals how he ‘lost’ GBP800 millions as General Manager of Baring Futures Singapore through foolhardy speculations on behalf of his employer, Barings Brothers – the world’s first merchant bank. http://www.kalahari.com/books/Rogue-Trader/632/256865.aspx

The Black Swan

By Nassim Nicholas Taleb. The Impact of the Highly Improbable. What have the invention of the wheel, Pompeii, the Wall Street Crash, Harry Potter and the internet got in common? Why are all forecasters con-artists? And, what can Catherine the Great’s lovers tell us about probability? This book shows us how to stop trying to predict everything and take advantage of uncertainty. http://www.kalahari.com/books/The-Black-Swan/632/32348089.aspx

The Wolf of Wall Street

By Jordan Belfort. Stock market multimillionaire at 26, federal convict at 36, he partied like a rock star, lived like a King, and barely survived his rise and fall as an American entrepreneurial icon. http://www.kalahari.com/books/The-Wolf-of-Wall-Street/632/32804838.aspx

 

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